A new, updated and expanded edition of our business bestseller, Future Work, is now out. It has a lot of exciting new content, as well as a fresh green jacket with testimonials from leading experts and executives.

The book covers the latest developments transforming the world of work, and demonstrates how pioneering organisations are adapting to rapid advances in communications technology, demographic shifts and changing attitudes to work.

With dozens of case studies, including new ones from Accenture, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Shell, Swiss Re and WPP, the book sets out the compelling case for a revolution in organizational cultures and working styles to boost output, cut costs, give employees more freedom and contribute to a greener economy.

Chapter 10 - "Making it happen yourself"

Alison Maitland's picture

Chapter 10 is a new chapter, which we’ve written to inspire and help individuals who want to introduce new ways of working in their organisation, department or team. There’s also advice on “dealing with technology overload”. And we address the dangers of ineffective management leaving remote workers feeling cut off, or overworked and burnt out.

Chapter 9 - "Making it happen as an organization"

Peter Thomson's picture

New ways of working are introduced for many different reasons. They may be driven by legislation, employee requests, union pressure or ‘diversity’ goals, or they could be the result of a rationalization of space designed to save costs. In Chapter 9 we show how a future work scheme is introduced as part of the business strategy and contributes to the bottom line.

Chapter 8 - "Strategies for change"

Alison Maitland's picture

How can organisations make a successful transition from the old world of work to the new one? In Chapter 8, the first of three chapters on implementing future work, we set out strategies for making the shift, including the crucial TRUST principles – our five global guidelines that have attracted attention around the world.

Chapter 7 - "Culture is Critical"

Peter Thomson's picture

We asked managers from across the world about their organization’s culture and how they would like it to change. The results of this survey are covered in Chapter 7 and show that managers think their current culture is too much ‘command and control’ and not enough ‘trust and empower’. So why haven’t they done something about it?

Chapter 6 - "Changing Workplaces"

Alison Maitland's picture

Does the office have a future? And what are the implications for management and leadership of the trend to new types of workplace? These are the questions we address in Chapter 6, with updates on the impact of the Microsoft office-of-the-future at Schiphol airport and the US government’s drive for more efficient use of federal buildings. There’s a new case study on culture change and activity-based working at Commonwealth Bank of Australia, as experienced by one of the bank’s top executives.

Chapter 5 - “Leaders for the new world of work”

Peter Thomson's picture

In Chapter 5 we look at the role of leaders and ask if managers rising through the organization have to sacrifice personal interests in the process.  Using examples from BDO, Addleshaw Goddard, the Foreign Office, Accenture and IBM we show that there are alternatives to the excessive work hours and unbalanced life that usually go along with top level jobs.

Chapter 4 - "Why it makes business sense"

Alison Maitland's picture

It makes good business sense for organisations to adopt an agile future work model as the norm, and in Chapter 4 of the book we explain why. More companies are starting to understand and act on the business case – in the UK, a coalition of firms has created the Agile Future Forum as a way to enhance the country’s economic competitiveness.

Chapter 3 - "Turning convention on its head"

Peter Thomson's picture

In Chapter 3 we ask why we have a long hours culture despite having technology that was supposed to make our working lives better. We show that rewarding people for the hours they work, rather than for results, produces poor productivity. We also point out that conventional flexitime schemes can result in clock-watching and disruption to business.

Chapter 2 - "How work has evolved"

Alison Maitland's picture

In the second chapter of our book, “How work has evolved”, we describe how working practices have developed over recent decades, driven by information technology and changing workforce expectations. The pace of these changes is now extraordinarily rapid, and established organisations are often struggling to keep pace or catch up as new types of work contract and new models of business spring up all over the place.

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