Zero-hours - not so bad after all

Peter Thomson's picture

The issue of zero-hours contracts has been the subject of widespread political debate and generated a mass of media headlines over the last few months. The CIPD have just released a report that sets out the debate and explores the issues using research based data from the Labour Market Outlook.

Future Work in Vancouver

Alison Maitland's picture

I'm looking forward to speaking on a panel at the International Women's Forum conference in Vancouver tomorrow, which has the theme of Modern Movements Shaping the World. There's a terrific buzz here, with around 800 women leaders attending from all over the world. Our panel is about "the future of work and the next economic revolution" and is one of a series of sessions looking at everything from technology to the enviornment, migration, health, sustainable cities, business, energy and food. Exciting stuff, and in such a beautiful city!

Future Work on BBC World Service

Alison Maitland's picture

I took part in a lively discussion on the BBC World Service this week about flexibility and the future of work. In the Balance asked "is work working?" and also featured the Guardian's Zoe Williams and Microsoft's Dave Coplin, who called in from a home studio made from old World Service equipment. Peter, meanwhile, was interviewed for an interesting BBC Radio 4 programme, The Homeworker, on 5 August which looked at the pros and (occasional) cons of remote work.

Megatrends Report

Peter Thomson's picture

A number of "Megatrends" over the last century have changed the world of work beyond recognition, according to a new report. However, the question remains whether businesses are sufficiently aware of, or prepared for, the future trends that will shape the way we work and the performance of our organisations and economies in the next decade.

Agile Future Forum Launched

Peter Thomson's picture

We are delighted to see the launch of the Agile Future Forum (AFF), with the aim of maximising the competitiveness of UK businesses in the global marketplace. Twenty-two businesses – including several well-known brands – who currently realise financial benefits through using workforce agility have joined together to help other UK businesses to do the same. 

Australia ripe for future work

Alison Maitland's picture

I spoke about Future Work at an excellent conference in Sydney last week organised by Women on Boards, which has driven the debate about gender balance as a business issue in Australia. With its vast distances yet congested major cities, Australia is ripe for new ways of working, but management attitudes and processes are a significant barrier.

Women, culture and competitiveness

Alison Maitland's picture

The low representation of women in top roles featured heavily at today's London launch of the annual Cranfield Female FTSE Report, monitoring the progress of women onto boards and executive committees. Maria Miller, UK minister for women and equality, asked what was the cost to the nation's prosperity if 60% of university graduates today are female yet women make up only a small percentage of top leaders. "I want to see a culture change," she said, noting that workplaces were designed by and for men.

'Cyberloafing' research measures the wrong thing

Peter Thomson's picture

A research report from Kansas State University and Southern Illinois University has just been published showing that American employees spend as much as 80 percent of their work time on the Internet “cyberloafing”, doing tasks that have nothing to do with their work. The report's authors believe that this results in lost productivity, so they recommend that companies tighten up their rules on the use of the Internet and point out the consequences of non-compliance.

Yahoo's crackdown on remote working

Alison Maitland's picture

Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo, seems to be trying to outdo her former employer, Google, with her decision to order all employees who work remotely to get back to the office. The leaked memo to staffers says "We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together". Just how that's supposed to make sense in a global company when people are travelling for work and collaborating across time zones is a mystery.

Employee satisfaction boosts shares

Alison Maitland's picture

A fascinating study from Wharton business school in the US has found what's claimed to be the strongest evidence so far that employee satisfaction is a significant driver of a company's value.

Pages

Subscribe to Future Work: RSS
© 2011-14 Future Work.