'Cyberloafing' research measures the wrong thing

Peter Thomson's picture

A research report from Kansas State University and Southern Illinois University has just been published showing that American employees spend as much as 80 percent of their work time on the Internet “cyberloafing”, doing tasks that have nothing to do with their work. The report's authors believe that this results in lost productivity, so they recommend that companies tighten up their rules on the use of the Internet and point out the consequences of non-compliance.

Yahoo's crackdown on remote working

Alison Maitland's picture

Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo, seems to be trying to outdo her former employer, Google, with her decision to order all employees who work remotely to get back to the office. The leaked memo to staffers says "We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together". Just how that's supposed to make sense in a global company when people are travelling for work and collaborating across time zones is a mystery.

Employee satisfaction boosts shares

Alison Maitland's picture

A fascinating study from Wharton business school in the US has found what's claimed to be the strongest evidence so far that employee satisfaction is a significant driver of a company's value.

Flexible Work and the Economy

Peter Thomson's picture

The Chancellor's Autumn Statement has reinforced the message that work flexibility is not just something that is socially desirable but is critical to the economy. Peter Cheese, Chief Executive of the CIPD, commented, "This statement underlines that the road to recovery hinges on the continued ability of the UK's flexible labour market to support employment growth in tough economic conditions.

The new "Power Part Time List"

Alison Maitland's picture

It's often said that senior roles can't be done part time - and that people working flexibly won't be promoted. That is the old world. Yesterday Timewise Jobs launched the first "Power Part Time List" of 50 people in the UK doing top jobs in a wide range of sectors on less than the traditional five days a week. I covered the story in yesterday's FT.

Preparing for the multi-generational workforce

Alison Maitland's picture

It's not just Gen Y and Z who expect to work differently, as many organisations seem to think. Employers should be adapting to a multigenerational workforce in which the majority are looking for greater flexibility. More than a third of UK workers expect to work beyond the traditional retirement age of 65, according to a Canada Life study reported this week in HR Review.

Extending flexibility to all

Alison Maitland's picture

In two years' time, if the British government's plans come to fruition, all employees will have the right to ask their employers if they can work flexibly. Today's announcement by Nick Clegg, the deputy prime minister, is a welcome step in the right direction (as is the reform to enable mothers and fathers to share parental leave flexibly). The problem is that this is still being framed primarily as a benefit for employees - and it is only a right to request, not a right to have flexibility.

A day for change

Alison Maitland's picture

Future Work will feature at the launch of the Center for Creative Leadership's new regional headquarters and training campus in Brussels tomorrow. The event is titled "A Day for Change" and I've been invited to speak about how to create change and to adapt and thrive in the new world of work - the subtitle of our book. I'm keen to see the campus, workshops and technology demonstrations as well as hearing the other speakers on leadership and change.

More control, less stress

Alison Maitland's picture

There's a solution to the rising levels of stress we're seeing in the current tough economic conditions - give people greater control over how, where and when they do their work. A new survey by Towers Watson and WorldatWork reports high levels of stress in companies around the world as employees are required to take on ever greater workloads and hours.

Olympic Legacy

Peter Thomson's picture

Now the Olympic Summer is over we can see if it has had any lasting effect onthe way people work. A post-Olympics survey of over 1,000 managers, published by the Institute of Leadership & Management (ILM), showed that almost half (48%) of managers said that the Olympics had resulted in higher morale in the office. 

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